Academic Courses

ENGLISH COURSES

English 9
Credit – 1
This course, required for all ninth-grade students, assists in developing, improving, and refining writing, speaking, listening, reading, and critical thinking skills. Instruction focuses on the writing process—including topic development, organization, style, word choice, sentence formation, and writing conventions. A diverse selection of classic and contemporary literature, as well as multi-media information sources, provide content for discussion and writing. Students demonstrate proficiency through oral presentations and writing expressive and informative texts. Additionally, students are required to complete book reports on self-selected literature. English 9 course content reflects Common Core State Standards.

English 9 Plus
Credit – 1 English and 1 Elective
This course assists in developing, improving, and refining writing, speaking, listening, reading, and critical thinking skills with additional support. Instruction focuses on the writing process—including topic development, organization, style, word choice, sentence formation, and writing conventions. A diverse selection of classic and contemporary literature, as well as multi-media information sources, provide content for discussion and writing. Students demonstrate proficiency through oral presentations and writing expressive and informative texts. Additionally, students are required to complete book reports on self-selected literature. This course meets every day to provide extended support and time to help students succeed at the college preparatory level to be ready for English 10. English 9 Plus course content reflects Common Core State Standards.

English 10
Credit – 1
This course, required for all tenth-grade students, reinforces the writing, speaking, listening, reading, and critical thinking skills attained by students in English 9. Students identify and access printed and technological sources, analyze and evaluate information, and integrate information from varied sources to produce written and oral reports. Emphasis is placed on developing argumentative and persuasive texts. In addition, students continue to read a diverse selection of classic and contemporary literature as well as analyze multi-media information sources. Students demonstrate acquired English language arts skills through individually selected readings and research. English 10 course content reflects Common Core State Standards.

English 11
Credit – 1
This course reinforces the writing, speaking, listening, reading, and critical thinking skills attained by students in English 9 and 10. Students identify and access print and digital sources, analyze and evaluate information, and integrate information from varied sources to produce written and oral reports. Using MLA format, students complete composition-based essays, exposing them to a variety of rhetorical patterns. In addition, students continue to read a diverse selection of classic and contemporary literature, and multi-media sources. English 11 course content reflects Common Core State Standards.


English 12
Credit – 1
This course reinforces skills begun in grades 9, 10, and 11. Students further develop and refine communication skills: writing, speaking, listening, reading, and critical thinking. Students identify and access print and digital sources, analyze and evaluate information, and integrate information from varied sources to produce written and oral reports. In addition, students continue to read a diverse selection of classic and contemporary literature as well as analyze videos. Students will develop a more mature understanding of the rhetorical patterns introduced in English 11 while furthering their proficiency in MLA formatting. English 12 course content reflects Common Core State Standards.

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition
Credit – 1
This is a one-credit course offered to all eleventh-grade students. In this college-level course, students will read and carefully analyze a broad and challenging range of fiction and nonfiction prose selections, deepening their awareness of rhetoric and how language works through the analysis of both current and classic texts. Through close reading and frequent writing, students develop their ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of purpose and strategy, while strengthening their composing abilities. Course readings feature expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. Students examine and work with essays, letters, speeches, images, and imaginative literature. Additionally, students will explore the use of language in songs, podcasts, and other forms of video. The course begins with in-depth instruction and exploration of the building blocks of language to develop strong writing basics before moving into the analysis of language and then the creation/application of language. Students are expected to collaborate with their classmates and provide input through active class discussions and debates. Students will explore diverse perspectives and gain a deeper understanding of their values. Students are encouraged to enter the class with an open mind and a desire to learn and grow through curiosity. This course prepares students with the necessary skills to succeed on the AP English Language and Composition Test from CollegeBoard.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition
Credit – 1
Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is designed to be a college-level course providing students with intellectual challenges and a workload aligned with typical undergraduate university English courses. Course materials will include novels, short prose narratives and essays, poems, and multimedia sources. Rather than plot, AP Lit teaches students to perform an intensive close read of materials to explore concepts like character, setting, structure, perspective, figurative language, and literary analysis. Students will obtain skills in understanding, analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating literature through personal reflection, in-class discussions, timed writings, and evaluative essays. This course prepares students with the necessary skills to succeed on the AP English Literature and Composition Test from CollegeBoard.

DTCC ENG 101: Composition I
Credit – 1
Prerequite – Designated by DTCC
This course will develop the critical thinking, writing, and research skills necessary to compose academic essays and to respond to diverse texts. Students will develop rhetorical strategies, employing writing processes to compose for a variety of purposes and audiences. This course requires a discounted fee toward earning three college credits.

 

DTCC ENG 102: Composition II
Credit – 1
Prerequisite – Designated by DTCC
This course will expand on the skills learned in ENG 101 to develop and enhance writing, research, and speaking skills. Students will complete informative, analytical, and thesis-driven argumentative writing assignments requiring them to read and systematically evaluate a variety of sources and to employ effective research methods to complete a capstone research project. Students will explore and practice research techniques preparing them for conducting research across academic disciplines and in their careers. This course requires a discounted fee toward earning three college credits.

Technical Reading
Credit – ½
Prerequisite - Assigned through the Counseling Office
Technical Reading is designed to support and improve the student’s reading comprehension, writing, speaking, and listening skills, as well as to increase vocabulary and general knowledge. Students will read, with guidance and independently, and respond to a variety of materials, with a strong emphasis on the analysis of informational and non-fiction texts. Students will learn and practice close reading strategies which will enable them to better comprehend complex, grade-level reading materials. Ultimately, this class aims to build stronger literacy skills to support the student’s academic and technical learning requirements.

MATHEMATIC COURSES

Algebra I Plus
Credit – 1 Math and 1 Elective
This course is the foundation for high school mathematics courses and is designed to assist students in meeting rigorous standards as measured by the Common Core State Standards. Students will master the following content: patterns, scatterplots, regressions, linear functions, linear inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, exponential functions, polynomials, factoring, and transformations of functions. Geometry and real-world applications are integrated throughout the course. This course is designed to improve the math skills of students who score low on the math portion of the 8th grade Delaware’s Smarter Balanced Assessment. The use of various mathematics technology is necessary.

Algebra I
Credit – 1
This course is the foundation for high school mathematics courses and is designed to assist students in meeting rigorous standards as measured by the Common Core State Standards. Students will master the following content: patterns, scatterplots, regressions, linear functions, linear inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, exponential functions, polynomials, factoring, and transformations of functions. Geometry and real-world applications are integrated throughout the course. The use of various mathematics technology is necessary.

Geometry
Credit – 1
Prerequisite- Algebra I or Algebra I Plus
This course is designed to build, integrate and extend algebraic knowledge through a comprehensive study of geometry. Students are expected to master rigorous standards as measured by the Common Core State Standards. Student instruction will integrate the basic elements of geometry, parallel and perpendicular lines, the coordinate plane, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, trigonometry, congruence and similarity, surface area, volume, and transformations. An understanding of geometric proof is carefully developed through real-world applications and integrated throughout the course. The use of various mathematics technology is necessary.

Algebra II - Accelerated
Credit – 1
Prerequisite - Algebra I and Geometry
This course is an in-depth analysis of algebraic reasoning and problem solving and is designed to assist students in meeting rigorous standards as measured by the Common Core State Standards. Students will master the following content: exponent and radical operations, systems of equations, transformations and graphing of functions, operations of functions, factoring, function notation, and matrices. Linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and polynomial functions are developed, clarified, and utilized to solve real-world problems. This course moves at an accelerated pace and complexity. The use of various mathematics technology is necessary.

Algebra II
Credit – 1
Prerequisite - Algebra I and Geometry
This course is an in-depth analysis of algebraic reasoning and problem solving and is designed to assist students in meeting rigorous standards as measured by the Common Core State Standards. Students will master the following content: exponent and radical operations, systems of equations, transformations and graphing of functions, operations of functions, factoring, function notation, and matrices. Linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and polynomial functions are developed, clarified, and utilized to solve real-world problems. The use of various mathematics technology is necessary.

Precalculus
Credit – 1
Prerequisite – Accelerated Algebra II
This course weaves together previous studies of Algebra, Geometry, and mathematical functions into a preparatory course for Calculus and AP Calculus. Throughout the course, Common Core State Standards are taught and reinforced as the student learns how to apply the concepts in real-world situations. Students will master the following content: exponential functions, logarithmic functions, circles, angles, trigonometry (right triangles, unit circle, sinusoidal graphs, reciprocal function graphs, inverse function analysis, identities, solving equations), polynomials, and conics sections. The use of various mathematics technology is necessary.

Statistics, Modeling, and Applications (SMA)
Credit – 1
Prerequisite - Algebra II
This course provides students with the use of real-world applications related to probability, statistics, data analysis, functions, geometry, and trigonometry. Students will master the following content: discretionary expenses, banking services, consumer credit, automobile ownership, independent living, and the stock market. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared for technical training, a range of career options, and college majors not math-intensive. The use of various mathematics technology is necessary.

Calculus
Credit – 1
Prerequisite - Pre-Calculus
This course is the foundation for a college Calculus I course. Students will master the following content: limits and continuity; derivative techniques for polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and natural logarithmic functions; definite integral techniques for polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions; real-world applications of differentiation through related rates, optimization, and particle motion; the area between two curves, and accumulation of change. The use of various mathematics technology is necessary.

Advanced Placement Calculus AB
Credit – 1
Prerequisite - Pre-Calculus
Required Summer Assignments
This course is the equivalent of a college Calculus I course. Students will master the following content: limits and continuity; derivative techniques for polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions; definite integral techniques for polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions; real-world applications of differentiation through related rates, optimization, and particle motion; area between two curves, accumulation of change, volumes of solids; differential equations and slope fields. Technology is an integral part of this course. The TI-84 Plus CE Edition is the calculator of choice. This course will prepare students to take the College Board Advanced Placement Calculus AB Exam.

Advanced Placement Statistics
Credit – 1
Prerequisite – Algebra II
The AP Statistics course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes evident in the content, skills, and assessment in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, probability and simulation, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding. The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics.

DTCC MAT 152: Quantitative Reasoning
Credit – 1
Prerequisite – Designated by DTCC
This course is designed to help students develop quantitative literacy skills which will be meaningful for their professional, civic, and personal life. An emphasis is placed on utilizing data to make good decisions and an understanding of the dangers inherent in basing decisions on anecdotal evidence rather than data. Students will focus on numbers, ratios, proportional reasoning, modeling, probability, and statistics. The learners will also investigate math problems helping them see how math fits into their world and enhance their skills at using mathematical reasoning to understand complex situations and make decisions. This course requires a discounted fee towards earning three college credit.

SOCIAL STUDY COURSES

World History
Credit – 1
This course uses a chronological approach from the mid-1300s (Bubonic Plague) into the 20th century (World Wars and Modern Genocide) to analyze world geography, cultures, politics, economics, history, and current events. Students learn about the diversity existing within cultures around the world. Students will understand the relationship between humans and the environment while analyzing issues of cultural and geographic regions in attempts to develop strategies to solve concerns using historical thinking skills. This course of study integrates with technical and other academic areas in various interdepartmental activities.


Civics/Economics
Credit – 1
This course (Semester 1) teaches students knowledge of government is essential for young adults to become responsible citizens. To achieve this goal, students study the purpose, structure, and ideals of the American constitutional government and its great documents. Additionally, students analyze various types and structures of past and present governments around the world. The rights, responsibilities, and privileges of being a United States citizen are also emphasized.

This course (Semester 2) teaches students the basic principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students examine the relationship between individuals, businesses, and governments within the U.S. economy, and the impact of scarcity on their decision-making. A key component of this course is the analysis of various economic indicators (i.e., GDP and Inflation). Additional study is devoted to comparing different economic systems and the dynamics of change in transitional emerging economies.

Civics/Economics integrates with technical and other academic areas in various interdepartmental activities.

United States History
Credit – 1
This course uses a chronological and thematic approach to enable students to examine the past and its influences on the present and the future. Students become familiar with United States History from 1850 to the present with an emphasis on the 20th century. Students examine, interpret, and analyze primary and secondary sources to develop multiple perspectives of historical events. Through the application of historical thinking skills, students will evaluate these past events and conclude. This course of study integrates with technical and other academic areas in various interdepartmental activities.

Advanced Placement United States History
Credit – 1
This course is designed to provide an iterative, college-level experience and preparation for the AP US History exam in May. An emphasis is placed on interpreting primary and secondary sources, applying detailed historical knowledge to historical understandings, and demonstrating historical thinking skills reflecting the discipline of History. Students are expected to master a significant body of historical information and to craft historical arguments from evidence. Topics of the course include: The Interaction Between Cultures in America and the Europeans, Life and Thought in Colonial America, the Ideology of the Revolution, the Development of the Constitution, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian Democracy, Manifest Destiny, Slavery and the Civil War, Reconstruction, Social Reform Movements, Immigration, Industrialization and Urbanization, World War One, the 1920s, The Great Depression and World War II, the Cold War, Post-Cold War America, and America at the beginning of the 21st century. In addition, the course reflects seven broad-based themes have emerged in the development of the United States: Cultural Identity, Work, Exchange and Technology, Migration and Peopling, Politics and Power, America and the World, Environment, and Geography, and Ideas, Beliefs, and Culture. Elements of these themes are included in unit assignments. Advanced Placement scholars are expected to devote significant independent scholarship and time outside the class to master fully the skills and themes presented. Before the start of school, students are expected to complete two summer assignments to complete their enrollment in the class. Students who pass the AP United States History exam may be entitled to receive college credit.

Advanced Placement Psychology
Credit – 1
Advanced Placement Psychology is designed to allow students to complete studies equivalent to an introductory college course in Psychology. This course covers thirteen intense units which introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other living things. Topics include the history and methodology of science, ethics, learning and cognition, development, and types of personality. Students who successfully pass the Advanced Placement exam may be entitled to college credit. Students must complete required summer coursework for enrollment in the course.

Global Issues
Credit – ½
This related course is designed to link geographic principles to the study of topics of a global nature, including levels of development, diffusion of ideas and viruses, the theory of global warming, population dynamics, globalization, indigenous peoples and the modern world, and the impact of humans on the environment. Emphasis is placed on student mastery of the application of knowledge to discrete tasks. In addition, Global Issues emphasizes the interactions of humans to scientific systems. For example, students study the water cycle to research the impact humans have on the environment. Tectonic plate theory is introduced to study how and why people live in dangerous environments. This course supports the integration of English literacy standards and Math numeracy standards and assists students in improving academic skills.

Psychology
Credit – ½
This course is a study of the science of the mind and how it influences human behavior. Theories and fundamentals are discussed in-depth with a strong focus on applications and careers. An overview of the different schools of psychology are studied including psychoanalytic, cognitive, biological, and sociocultural theories. Focus topics include psychology and the brain, consumer psychology, developmental psychology, and behavioral psychology.

Sociology
Credit – ½
This course provides students with an understanding of group behavior in society through the lens of the three major theoretical perspectives taken by sociologists. Students will examine culture and social structure, the individual in society, social inequality, social institutions, and the changing social world. Understanding sociology helps students make vivid connections to real-world events and critically think about how social patterns and structures shape the human world. This course of study integrates with technical and other academic areas in various interdepartmental activities.

DTCC PSY 121: Psychology
Credit – 1
Prerequsite – Designated by DTCC
This course is a survey of general principles underlying human behavior and mental processes. Topics include the nervous system, perception, learning, motivation, personality, and psychological disorders. Methods of assessment and research principles are discussed. This course requires a discounted fee toward earning three college credits.


DTCC SOC 111: Sociology
Credit - 1
Credit – Prerequsite – Designated by DTCC
This course provides an analysis of American social organization and culture through a cross-cultural perspective. Sociology investigates, describes, and analyzes patterns of human behavior in all areas of human experience for purpose of understanding the human condition. This course requires a discounted fee toward earning three college credits.

 

SCIENCE COURSES

Integrated Science
Credit – 1
Integrated Science examines the principles of energy, waves, and properties of matter and their relationships to the individual, society, and the world. This laboratory science course explores the concepts of conservation of matter and energy as they relate to physical, chemical, and geological systems. Course content reflects state and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Principles of Biology and Chemistry
Credit – 1
Principles of Biology and Chemistry build upon concepts studied in Integrated Science. This laboratory science course explores the nature of science, ecology, energy transfers in life processes, evolution by natural selection, cell structure and function, biochemistry, genetics, and biotechnology. Course content reflects state and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Chemistry
Credit – 1
Building on knowledge developed in Integrated Science and Principles of Biology and Chemistry, this course expands upon concepts of chemistry including: atomic theory, chemical formulas, reactions, mixtures and solutions, gas laws, and nuclear theory. Through laboratory experiences, students develop an understanding of chemical concepts and their applications. This course is designed for students who wish to gain an entry-level foundation in chemistry. Course content reflects state and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Physics
Credit – 1
Building on knowledge developed in Integrated Science, physics investigates theory and application of Classical Mechanics, Newton’s Laws of Motion, Electrical Systems, Electromagnetic Waves, Universal Gravitation, and Astronomy. Through participation in laboratory experiences, students develop an understanding of connections between physics and the workings of simple and complex technological devices. Topics are studied in-depth and mathematics is stressed throughout the course. Course content reflects state and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Anatomy/Physiology
Credit – 1
This course covers anatomy and physiology as it relates to the human body. Micro-anatomy of cells and tissues and gross anatomy of body systems are emphasized. Students gain an understanding of anatomy and physiology through the use of microscopes, dissection of laboratory animals, and mammalian organ observation and experimentation. The relationship between body structure and function is related to health and clinical practice. This course is highly recommended for any student interested in pursuing a career in Health and Human Services.

DTCC BIO 100: Medical Terminology
Credit - 1
Prerequsite – Designated by DTCC
This course introduces terms comprising the language of medicine. Topics include Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, roots, and abbreviations as well as terms related to disease and surgical, laboratory, imaging, and clinical procedures. Emphasis is placed on defining, pronouncing, and appropriately using the terms in written and oral communication. This course requires a discounted fee toward earning three college credits.

DTCC BIO 115: Nutrition
Credit – 1
Prerequsite – Designated by DTCC
This course covers the basic principles of nutrition and their application to the health and well-being of humans throughout the life cycle. The role of diet therapy in the prevention and treatment of disease is included. This course requires a discounted fee toward earning three college credits.

DTCC CHM 110: General Chemistry
Credit – 1
Prerequsite – Designated by DTCC
This course is designed for students majoring in technical areas other than chemistry. Topics include the metric system, structure of matter, nomenclature, reactions, gases, rates and equilibrium, solutions, acids, bases, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory experiments are used to illustrate the theory. This course requires a discounted fee toward earning four college credits.

DTCC BIO 120: Anatomy & Physiology I
Credit – 1
Prerequsite – Designated by DTCC
This course studies the anatomy and physiology of humans, including the structure and function of cells, tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems. Coordinated laboratory experiments are an integral part of this course. This course requires a discounted fee toward earning five college credits.

WORLD LANGUAGE

Spanish 1
Credit – 1
This is an introductory course designed around the belief that the purpose of learning Spanish is to communicate with the people who speak it and to understand their culture. The goal of Spanish I is for students to acquire the skills needed to allow them to engage in authentic communication in Spanish. Classroom activities will consist of frequent pair and group interactions. Many units will conclude with interpersonal or presentational summative activities showing students have acquired the required proficiency level of Novice High by the end of the course. Students will be expected to participate actively in every lesson, every day. This course is closely aligned with the Delaware State Foreign Language Standards.

Spanish 2
Credit – 1
Prerequisite – Spanish 1
This secondary course is organized around the principle that foreign language learning should be meaningful, practical, and authentic. The goal of Spanish 2 is to build on the proficiency skills acquired in Spanish 1 and continue to emphasize authentic communication. Frequent pair and group activities will provide ample opportunity to practice in class. Many units will conclude with interpersonal or presentational summative activities showing students have acquired the required proficiency level of Intermediate Low by the end of the course. Most classroom instruction is in Spanish and students are also expected to speak primarily in Spanish. This course is closely aligned with the Delaware State Foreign Language Standards.

Spanish 3
Credit – 1
Prerequisite – Spanish 2
This advanced course emphasizes meaningful, practical, and authentic Spanish language practice. The majority of instruction is in Spanish and students are expected to speak primarily in Spanish. In this course, students will cover units based in the global community which emphasizes proficiency in authentic communication. Many units will conclude with interpersonal, interpretive, or presentational summative activities showing students have mastered the required proficiency level of Intermediate Low by the end of the course. This course is closely aligned with the Delaware State Foreign Language Standards.

Spanish 4
Credit – 1
Prerequisite – Spanish 3
This advanced course emphasizes meaningful, practical, and authentic Spanish language practice. The vast majority of instruction is in Spanish and students are expected to speak primarily in Spanish. In this course, students will cover units based on the global community with a focus on art, history, and literature. Most units will conclude with interpersonal, interpretive, or presentational summative activities showing students have mastered the required proficiency level of Intermediate Mid by the end of the course. This course is closely aligned with the Delaware State Foreign Language Standards.

Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture
Credit – 1
Prerequisite – Spanish 3 with Teacher Recommendation
This is a challenging, accelerated course designed for students who already have strong skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening and are interested in developing a more in-depth understanding of the Spanish language and culture. This course is conducted entirely in Spanish and its main objective is to promote advanced skills in all areas of the Spanish language through the use of authentic materials. The course content is aligned with the College Board AP Spanish Language and Culture Course Description and the instructor will make wide use of authentic resources and online AP resources. During the summer, students must complete required assignments and maintain contact with the teacher through email and online forums. This course will prepare students to take the Spanish Language AP test at the end of the school year. Students who successfully pass the Advanced Placement exam may be entitled to college credit.

Physical Education/Health

Physical Education 
Credit – ½
This course is aligned with the Delaware Physical Education Standards.  This Physical Education course is designed to develop skills helping students maintain fitness throughout their life.  Physical Education provides instructional opportunities which instill beneficial physical fitness habits, encourage student engagement, and promote team-building skills through a sequential program of sport, leisure, and recreational activities.  Every Physical Education student will also participate in state-mandated fitness testing.  Students will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness, and movement for a lifetime.

Health
Credit – ½
Course Description: Health Education is a one-half credit State of Delaware Department of Education graduation requirement for all high school students.  The focus of Health Education is to provide students with knowledge, understanding, strategies, and activities which will enhance individual healthy lifestyle choices.  The essential goals of the curriculum are to develop healthy behaviors, healthy attitudes, and practical skills and to develop a plan for the prevention of health problems and behaviors leading to a quality lifestyle.